Isle of Mull Self Catering – Crannich Caravans

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Crannich Holiday Caravans Glen Aros “The Valley of the Eagles” PA72 6JP

Isle of Mull Self Catering Caravans within spectacular Glen Aros “the valley of Eagles” all modern Luxury including WIFI, the perfect place to see breeding Eagles Otters, basking sharks or take boat trips to amazing little Hebridean islands or simply enjoy the un-spoilt beauty and spectacular landscapes.

Glen Aros is well known for it’s large population of breeding eagles and Crannich Self Catering Caravans are ideally situated within 150 acres of farmland in Glen Aros on the Isle of Mull, offering great walks, panoramic views of the glen, Loch Frisa and the river Aros, with the Morvern hills in the distance and the most fantastic sunsets.

Glen Aros is the ideal location for visiting the White Tailed Eagle ‘hide’ and other wildlife. ‘This very privileged position offers direct views across the glen to the nest area and the Loch Frisa hide’ Situated very close to the forest cycle trails. This central location also offers an ideal base to tour the whole of the Isle of Mull and the small offshore Islands such as Iona, Ulva and Staffa.

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  • Remote Country Holiday Caravans stunning views
  • Working Farm location Glen Aros the valley of the Eagles
  • Living room and Kitchen diner
  • TV / DVD Player
  • 1 Double Bedrooms & 1 Twin Bedroom
  • Family Shower-room W/C and Washbasin
  • Fully fitted kitchen including Oven / Hob, Fridge Freezer, Microwave
  • Free Broadband WiFi
  • Washing Drying Facility
  • Sitting Room with Sofas and Satelite TV / DVD
  • Electric Heating and Gas Stove
  • Off road parking
  • Patio area and gardens
  • Bedding and Towels
  • Pets Welcome with Supplement
  • The nearest village is Salen 6 miles with Inn, Shop and Post Office
  • Glen Aros is the Valley of the Eagles – you will see many living and breeding here
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    Welcome to the Isle of Mull

    The Isle of Mull is renowned for it’s landscape, wildlife, beaches and hills – but there’s a lot more to Mull than this. Discover about it’s history, the hidden geology and structure, the contemporary island culture. You can cycle along hundreds of quiet roads and forest tracks. Feast on hill reared beef and lamb, wild venison and creel caught shellfish.

    Just 40 minutes from Oban, eagles and otters go about their daily lives

    Since the first pilgrims arrived in small boats, Scotland has welcomed visitors into the life of it’s islands. Mull is a real place with real lives going on round about you, both on land and sea. Mass tourism has been resisted. Instead actively focusing on the individual traveller and the quality of the visit and of the accommodation and attractions provided.

    Crannich Farm offers you a place to breathe out and relax. A place to refresh yourself. If you are returning to your loved and familiar places, or are arriving on the Isle of Mull for the first time, our door will be open.

    So how do I get to the Isle of Mull….?

    The Isle of Mull is easily reached via the the Caledonian MacBrayne car ferry from Oban to Craignure (Isle of Mull) Throughout the year there is a regular service 7 days a week taking just 40 minutes. “Advance booking recommended” Caledonian MacBrayne Ferries & Fares

    Crannich Farm and Glen Aros

    Crannich Farm lies in a gentle glen with great walks, burns and waterfalls. It is a working farm with it’s own highland cattle and horses. It adjoins thousands of acres of Forestry Commission land all of which is easily accessible . The river Aros is a short walk and Loch Frisa is about 1 mile away. For fishing enthusiasts permits are available from local outlets at Tobermory.

    There is an abundance of wildlife around Glen Aros and on the Island generally. We have regular sightings of golden eagles over Crannich forest and the sea eagles recently featured on BBC springwatch programme. They have been nesting for the last few years across the glen at Loch Frisa where people have been able to view the eagles nest from a live viewing hide.

    Isle of Mull Culture, Wildlife and Nature

    The Isle of Mull has an abundance of wildlife from basking sharks and dolphins to Golden eagles and Corncrakes. With luck you can also see Otters, Seals, Porpoises, Gannets, Peregrines, Artic Terns, Cormorants, Buzzards. Deer tend to keep to the high ground during the summer. The islands provide total peace and tranquility. The landscape and history together with the hospitality of its people provide a wonderful escape from the pressures of modern life. There are towering hills and Munro’s such as Ben More, tranquil valleys, colourful wild flowers and beaches and bays packed with wildlife. Whether you see Mull on foot, bike, bus or car.

    Whether you see Mull on foot or from a bus or car….”Always take a camera with you”

    Activities on your doorstep

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    A summary of all other attractions and services provided on the Isle of Mull

    An Tobar Tobermory, Isle of Mull Art Centre, gallery and cafe. Year round concerts, exhibitions and workshops
    Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust The HWDT is dedicated to enhancing knowledge and understanding of Scotland’s whales, dolphins and porpoises and the Hebridean marine environment through education, research and working within local communities
    Landrover Wildlife Expeditions Tobermory, Daily landrover expeditions to see otters, eagles, seals, porpoise etc

    Mull Museum Tobermory Small museum crammed with information about the history of Mull and its people

    Mull Rail Craignure, Steam and diesel hauled trains on narrow gauge railway between Craignure and Torosay Castle
    Mull Theatre Acclaimed professional theatre based on the Isle of Mull.

    Sea Life Surveys Join in the research and fun with the UK’s first and most experienced whale watch. Also other wildlife galore: dolphins, porpoises, seals and birds seen on our daily cruises. Live-aboard and land based package holidays of 3-7 days.

    Turus Mara Seabird and Wildlife Cruises Wildlife and Birdwatching trips. Visit The Treshnish Isles, Staffa and Iona. See puffins, seals.

    Fantastic Days out on the Isle of Mull

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    The Isle of Iona

    The sacred Isle of Iona and it’s many remnants from the past

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    The sacred Isle of Iona lies to the West of Mull and is accessed by a short 10 minute ferry crossing from Fionnphort. Iona is a tiny island, of typically Hebridean beauty, it holds a unique place in the story of Scotland and kindles the imagination of thousands who journey there each year. Yet it is also where people have lived, worked and worshipped over many centuries. To and from its shores have come monks and pilgrims, clan chiefs and kings, artists and craftsmen, farmers and fishermen. Of the earliest, we catch only fleeting glimpses now.

    Stone Age flints and tools unearthed by the plough, a grassy cairn where some Bronze Age mourners laid their dead, fragments of pots, beads and bones have all been found on Iona, which speak of a thriving Iron Age community early in the first millennium.

    Later members of the Columban settlement became skilled in the working of metal, glass, wood and leather. Succeeding generations bequeathed a rich artistic legacy in their intricately carved stones and crosses, fine prayers and poems, and exquisite illuminated manuscripts. The life of the crofting population down the ages is etched into rigs on the landscape, immortalised in Gaelic place names and remembered in local lore. Today’s island community follows in the tradition of all those who have gone before them – helping shape Iona’s story in new ways, fostering a variety of creative talents and continuing to welcome visitors from across the globe.

    Recommended places to visit while on Iona include Iona Pottery and Oran Creative Crafts

    Isle of Iona A craft co-operative on Iona selling wide range of locally made products.

    The Iona Monastery and one of it’s beautiful beaches

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    Staffa and Fingal’s cave

    It is spectacular and most definitely one of the 10 wonders of the world

    Made famous by Mendelssohn’s Classic Hebridees overture “Fingals Cave” this amazing lost world is reached in a 45 minute sea journey from Fionnphort (Mull) Fingal’s Cave is always splendid and atmospheric with basaltic columns formed 59 million years ago. Puffins can be seen ashore in season and often guillemots, fulmars, great skuas, eider ducks, gannets, kittewakes, black-backed gulls, great northern divers and razorbills on the water. If you are lucky it is possible to see occasionally a passing whale, basking shark, porpoise, dolphin or otter. The boat trips last up to 3 hours and you can disembark at Fionnphort or Iona. Tel: 01681 700358 Website: www.staffatrips.co.uk

    The Isle of Staffa looking out to the Treshnish Isles and the spectacular Fingals cave

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    Tobermory – the Island Capital

    Within an easy 30 minutes from Salen lies the capital of Mull Tobermory “the fictional Balamory” built as a fishing port in the late 18th century and is now the main village on Mull. It is a picture-postcard of a place with the brightly painted buildings along the main street to the pier and the high wooded hills surrounding the bay. The village has a good variety of shops, hotels, and other accommodation as well as being the administrative centre for the island. The harbour is always busy with fishing boats, yachts and the ferry to and from Kilchoan during the summer months.

    There is reputed to be the wreck of a Spanish galleon somewhere in the mud at the bottom of the bay. The ship was part of the defeated Spanish Armada of 1588 and was fleeing the English fleet when she anchored in Tobermory to take on provisions. Following a dispute over payment the ship caught fire which caused the gunpowder to explode. She was supposed to have been carrying millions of gold coins when she went to the bottom but no-one has ever managed to find any significant treasure. Recently, Tobermory has been the setting for the children’s programme Balamory. The Isle of Mull and Iona are ideal places to base yourself for viewing the wildlife of Scotland. Species include whales and dolphins, eagles, otters, birds of prey and many other mammals.

    Tobermory “the fictional Balamory”

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    The Isle of Ulva

    For the great outdoors, the magical Isle of Ulva provides delightfully stress free hill walking and wildlife spotting, the Island is accessed by a short 5 minute ferry crossing from Mull.

    This private island is open to the public and viewed on a large scale, Ulva and its neighbouring island Gometra appear to be a peninsula of the Isle of Mull, as they are separated from one another by narrow straits. Caolas Ulbha (the Sound of Ulva) at the east of the island is a narrow channel a few hundred metres across to Ulva Ferry on Mull. To its west, it is separated from Gometra by Gometra Harbour. To the south are Mull’s headlands of Ardmeanach and the Ross of Mull. To the north, Loch Tuath (Loch-a-Tuath) separates it from another headland of Mull, and to the south east is Loch na Keal (Loch nan Ceall), and the island of Eorsa.

    There are two main bays on the south coast, Port a’ Bhàta, and Tràigh Bhàn. On the north coast, there is the horseshoe bay of Lòn Bhearnuis (Bearnus lagoon), Soriby Bay and a few minor inlets.

    During your day out on Ulva it is well worth visiting the Isle of Ulva Heritage Centre by Ulva Ferry, which has and information centre, tearoom / restaurant serving the finest oysters.

    The highest point of Ulva is Beinn Chreagach at 313 metres (1,027 ft). It has a neighbour in Beinn Eoligarry whose summit is 306 metres (1,004 ft) The island has a central ridge, with the highest ground running along its lateral axis – this ridge is somewhat broken by Gleann Glas and some other valleys. The south east peninsula tends to be lower lying, with a small plain along the south coast, consisting of raised beaches.

    Ulva Sound at peace with the world…and some of Ulvas inhabitants

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    Castles on the Isle of Mull

    Glengorm Castle is situated on the Northern tip of the Isle of Mull near Tobermory, overlooking the Atlantic it has views over 60 miles to the Outer Hebrides and Islands of Uist, Rhum and Canna. The Castle was built in 1860 and sits at the headland of Glengorm’s vast area of coastline, forestry, lochs and hills. Glengorm truly stands apart from the surrounding Western Isles, already known for its dramatic scenery, due to its tranquillity and sheer natural beauty.

    Majestic Duart Castle stands high and proud to the East of Mull guarding the Firth of Mull and the sea way from Oban, it is the historical base for the Clan MacLean, dating back to 1367 and has understandably been involved in many battles over the years. In 1647 Duart Castle was attacked and laid siege to by the Argyll government troops of Clan Campbell, but they were defeated and driven off by the Royalist troops of Clan MacLean.

    In September 1653, a Cromwellian task force of six ships anchored off the castle, but the Macleans had already fled to Tiree. A storm blew up on the 13 September and three ships were lost, including HMS SwanTemplate:WP Ships HMS instances.

    In 1678, Archibald Campbell, 9th Earl of Argyll, son of the Marquess of Argyll, successfully invaded the Clan MacLean lands on the Isle of Mull and garrisons Duart Castle. Later in 1691 Duart Castle was surrendered by the Clan MacLean to the chief of Clan Campbell, Archibald Campbell, 1st Duke of Argyll.

    The castle was abandoned in 1751. However, it was bought by Sir Fitzroy Donald Maclean, the 26th Chief of the Clan MacLean, in 1911, and has since been restored. The castle was used as a location in the 1999 film Entrapment, starring Sean Connery and Catherine Zeta-Jones. The castle also features prominently in the 1971 film When Eight Bells Toll, starring Anthony Hopkins.

    Torosay Castle and Gardens Torosay is a beautiful and welcoming Victorian family home surrounded by 12 acres of spectacular gardens.

    Duart Castle (left) and Glengorm castle (Right)

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    Local area information

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    Less than 10 minutes from Glen Aros lies the village of Salen. Facilities include an extremely well stocked Spa shop selling fresh meat, vegetables, bread, tinned provisions, soft and alcoholic drinks and newspapers. DVD’s are also available to rent out. Tel 01680 300472.

    There is also Rowley’s Filling Station selling diesel, unleaded petrol, oil, car accessories, confectionery, soft drinks and ice cream. It is open 7 days a week Tel 01680 300326

    There is also a Post Office and Launderette open 6 days a week and as well as the usual post office services it also sells a range of cards and stationery supplies. The launderette is located behind the office. Please check the number below for opening times. Tel 01680 300321

    There is also a Red Cross Charity Book Shop and Wheelchair Hire usually open Tuesday and Friday mornings 10.30 – 12 noon. Wheelchair hire is also available. For more details contact Irene Patterson. Tel 01680 300446

    Salen Surgery and medical centre is located on Pier Road in the village. Please call the telephone number below to check on opening times or if you need assistance.Tel:01680 300327, In emergency there is Salen Hospital Tel 01680 300392

    Isle of Mull Self Catering – Accommodation

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    Choice of 3 holiday caravans with similar facilities, set in their own grounds on land nearby the farmhouse and barns with glorious views of the Glen Aros valley. Each caravan sleeps four people comfortably with two bedrooms, one double and a twin.

    There is a kitchen dining living area with gas cooker and oven, microwave, fridge freezer and TV / DVD player and gas fire.

    The bathroom has hot shower hand basin and WC , and the twin room has facility to accommodate a cot which can be provided on request.

    The bathroom and bedrooms all have electric heaters. All bed linen towels and tea towels are included apart from cot bedding. Gas and electric are inclusive.

    Outside each caravan is a sitting area with a picnic table and garden . There is a fenced off pond which has been established to attract wildlife. There is good separation between the caravans which all have open views and each has its own parking space. Visiting Ducks and wildlife.

    ARRIVAL & VACATION TIMES

    We are quite happy with late arrivals within reason as long as we know in advance. Caravans are available from 5pm on day of arrival and must be vacated by 10am on departure day.

    Please note: Earlier arrivals than 5 pm are possible by pre- arrangement only, please contact us in advance if you need to arrange an earlier arrival time

    All our caravans are non-smoking and we allow a well behaved pet in Bellart Caravan subject to a £10.00 additional fee