Sea View Cottage West Coast – Ladybank House Turnberry

Georgian Self Catering Mansion House Turnberry

For Owner Direct rates Tel: 01729 851181 Texts to 07885 211787 (7 Days)

A magnificent refurbished Georgian West Coast Cottage, spectacular Sea views, Open Fires, Games Rooms in its own grounds sleeping up to 14. Just 2 miles from the world famous royal Turnberry links Golf Course this Scottish West Coast location offers you everything from Golfing, fantastic hill walks and uncrowded beaches to excellent touring base for The Galloway Forest, Ayrshire, Solway Coastline and Dumfries & Galloway regions.

Recently refurbished, while at the same time retaining it’s warmth and charm of yesteryear. This magnificent West Coast Holiday Home Features Charles Rennie Mackintosh style furniture and is the perfect location for large group self catering, team building, walking, golfing groups and family & friend get together’s.

A most welcoming hall receives you at ground level, leading to a drawing room with open fire, dining room with dining table that can seat 12 adults with wood burning stove. Along with the grand kitchen a drying room, utility room, w.c and games room with pool table. The bedrooms are all situated on the floors above with one bedroom with en-suite bathroom and five further bedrooms with two bathrooms. All the bedrooms have zip-and-link beds, making them either double or twin rooms. furniture, three super king size beds, an original roll top bath and stunning views across the Firth of Clyde.

 

  • Georgian Mansion, Sleeps up to 14, Detached, Countryside Location, Sea Views, Fridge / Freezer, Washing / Dryer, Dishwasher, Car Parking, Sky TV / DVD, WIFI, Full Central Heating, Open Fire, Wood Stove, Games Room, Bedding and Towels, Pet’s Welcome, Large Gardens, Pubs and Shops within 2 miles.

Quick Availability Enquiry – no obligations

 


Turnberry & it’s world famous Golf Course

Your Accommodation Local Activities Enquiries + Bookings Travel Directions Turnberry and Golf Fantastic Day Trips

The world famous Turnberry golf resort comprises three links golf courses, Ailsa, Arran, Kintyre and a golf academy. The course offers magnificent views of the island Ailsa Craig to the west. During the first World War the buildings were used as an airbase and a landing strip was built and still exists, today (disused). During this period, the Royal Flying Corps also trained pilots in the arts of aerial gunnery and combat, and the Turnberry Hotel was used as a hospital for the wounded. The cycle was repeated for World War II. The hotel was commissioned as a hospital, and the golf courses were seconded for air training for the RAF. Designer Mackenzie Ross is credited with restoring the courses to their high quality, and the Ailsa course was re-opened in 1951, a seaside links with stunning views of Ailsa Craig and the Isle of Arran. The course is open all year round and welcomes day visitors with green fees starting from just £25.00 on the Arran course.

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Ayrshire’s finest Beaches

The west coast of Ayrshire offers some of the finest sandy beaches in Scotland, on your doorstep is of course Turnberrys much publicized fine sands and Bay, less than 30 minutes to the North lie the award winning beaches based around the county town of Ayr spanning 4 miles from from The heads of Ayr all the way through to Braehead

“Turberry Beach…and 4 miles of sand from Heads of Ayr to Braehead”

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Ailsa Craig

Ailsa Craig (Scottish Gaelic: Creag Ealasaid) is the name of the island you can see from the windows, where blue hone granite is quarried to make curling stones. “Ailsa” is pronounced “ale-sa”, with the first syllable stressed. This now uninhabited island is formed from the volcanic plug of an extinct volcano. The island was a haven for Catholics during the Scottish Reformation in the 16th century, but is today a bird sanctuary, providing a home for huge numbers of gannets and an increasing number of puffins. The island is located approximately 10 miles (16 km) west of Girvan. Two miles (3 km) in circumference and rising to 1,110 feet (340 m), the island consists entirely of the volcanic plug of an extinct volcano that might have been active about 500 million years ago.

The following seabirds breed regularly on Ailsa Craig Fulmar, Gannet, Shag, Lesser Black-backed Gull, Herring Gull, Great Black-backed Gull, Kittiwake, Razorbil, Guillemot, Puffin, Black Guillemot. Boat trips to see these birds and the Island Ailsa Craig are available through Mark McCrindle, Tel 01465 713219 Email mccrindlem@aol.com

 

The Galloway Forest Park

To the South lies the fantastic Galloway Forest Park this huge woodland park of some 300 square miles (780 km2), includes moorland, lochs and from seashore to mountain tops a habitat for a variety of plants. Operated by Forestry Commission Scotland. The park, established in 1947, receives over 800,000 visitors per year. The three visitor centres at Glen Trool, Kirroughtree, and Clatteringshaws receiving around 150,000 each year.

Much of the Galloway Hills lie within the boundaries of the park, where you can enjoy a good peaceful stroll on one of the many woodland trails. There are a total of 27 waymarked forest trails to choose from, there is something for every walker, or if you fancy something a little more strenuous, head out to the hills and climb the Merrick, south Scotland’s highest peak.

You can also rock climb and ice-climb within the park. Within or near the boundaries of the park are several well developed mountain bike tracks, forming part of the 7stanes project. As well as catering for recreation, the park includes economically valuable woodland, producing 500,000 tons of timber per year. For the wildlife fan the park has some of Scotland’s most amazing wildlife – but without the long drive north! Red Squirrels, Otter, Pine Marten, Black Grouse, Golden Eagles, Red Deer and even Nightjar.

The famous dark skies over the forest Park also offer ideal star gazing and there are some fantastic Fishing lochs and rivers here too, all in beautiful surroundings, featuring a variety of fish from Brown Trout to Salmon. Fishing permits are available from £6.00 it’s a great way to spend the day.

Other activities within the park include Canoeing and Mountain biking with some seriously amazing mountain bike trails. From beginner to adrenaline seeker, there is something for everyone.

“The sensational Galloway Forest Park…on your doorstep”

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Turnberry, Girvan and Ayr

Your Accommodation Local Activities Enquiries + Bookings Travel Directions Turnberry and Golf Fantastic Day Trips

The nearest village of Maidens includes a well stocked village store, Post office, and the excellent Wildings restaurant / bar. There is also Dalduff farm within walking distance selling a quality range of home grown produce. Also the fantastic Turnberry resort open to non residents with Swimming pool, Health Spa’s, gymnasium and of course golf. The nearest town with a good range of facilities including Supermarkets, Restaurants, Pubs, Tourist information and boat trips to Ailsa Craig is Girvan 4 miles.

The nearest train station is also Girvan 4 miles with direct services to Stranraer for Belfast and Glasgow for London, Manchester, Birmingham and Edinburgh. The nearest airport is in Prestwick (Ayr) 22 miles away.

The nearest major town of Ayr lies to the North with all major supermarkets and high street shops. Ayr boasts quality Sandy beaches stretching over 4 miles. Ayr’s main industry is tourism with many quality bars, cafes and Restaurants.

The popular coastal resort of Ayr

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Fantastic Day Trips

Your Accommodation Local Activities Enquiries + Bookings Travel Directions Turnberry and Golf Fantastic Day Trips

Dumfries and Galloway

Dumfries and Galloway lies to the north of the Solway Firth and to the east of the Irish Sea making it the perfect touring base to explore all these regions. Bordering South Ayrshire, East Ayrshire and South Lanarkshire to the North and in the east the Scottish Borders; and to the south the county of Cumbria in England.

The region is well-known for its many famous artists and writers such as Robert Burns also known as Rabbie Burns, Scotland’s favourite son, the Ploughman Poet, the Bard of Ayrshire and in Scotland as simply The Bard) was a poet and a lyricist, laid to rest in Dumfries he is regarded as the national poet of Scotland and is celebrated worldwide. His former kingdom covers the majority of the Western area of the Southern Uplands, it also hosts Scotland’s most Southerly point, at the Mull of Galloway in the west of the region. Kirkcudbrightshire bounded on the north and north-west by Ayrshire, on the west and southwest by Wigtownshire, on the south and southeast by the Irish Sea and the Solway Firth, and on the east and northeast by Dumfriesshire.

Rabbie Burns, Kirkudbright harbour and Panorama of the Solway Firth

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Dumfries border Town

Dumfries has a population of around 38,000 and sits close to the Solway Firth near the mouth of the famous River Nith. Dumfries was the county town of the former county of Dumfriesshire. It’s nickname is Queen of the South. In 1186, Dumfries was officially given the rights of a royal burgh. Throughout the first 50 years of its foundation the town was at the forefront of the Scottish Borders until the consolidation of Galloway in 1234. A royal castle, which no longer exists, was built in the 13th century on the site of the present Castledykes Park, and before becoming King of Scots, Robert the Bruce slew the Red Comyn at Greyfriars Kirk in the town in 1306. His uncertainty about the fatality of his stabbing caused one of his followers, Roger de Kirkpatrick, to utter the famous, “I mak siccar” (“I make sure”) and finish the Comyn off.

Dumfries High Street hosts many of the historical, social and commercial centres of the town. During the 1990s, these areas enjoyed various aesthetic recognitions from organisations including Britain in Bloom. The town offers the visitor every facility and attraction desired, with all the usual high street, shops, supermarkets, cafes and banks, along with numerous leisure centres, a swimming pool, cinema and Inter City rail station, with direct servicess to Ayshire and Glasgow in the North and Carlisle, Hexham and the lakes in the South.

Views of Dumfries and the River Nith

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The Scottish Borders

You can also reach the Scottish Borders within couple of hours covering some 1800 square miles, the Scottish Borders stretch from the rolling hills and moorland in the west, through gentle valleys to the rich agricultural plains of the east and on to the rocky Berwickshire coastline with its secluded coves and picturesque villages.

You will discover castles, abbeys, stately homes and museums illustrating the exciting and often turbulent history of the area. Celebrations of music, arts and literature, and local food and drink take place throughout the year. June and July are a great time to watch the Common Ridings. In high summer and autumn you can enjoy the attractions of sheep dog trials, Border Games and the Scottish Championship Horse Trials. The Selkirk Vintage Classic and Veteran Vehicle Show in September offers 2 days of pure nostalgia. The area offers excellent opportunities for walking, cycling, playing golf and horse riding. The River Tweed runs through the centre of the Scottish Borders. Fed by its many tributaries, it provides some of the best fishing in the country.

In 1566 Mary Queen of Scots stayed in the town at a house which now tells the story of her tragic life. Up on a hill overlooking the town, Jedburgh Castle Jail is also open to the public as a museum. The town’s red sandstone abbey on the banks of the Jed Water was founded in 1138 by David I and was pillaged and rebuilt many times. Now cared for by Historic Scotland, the abbey is open to visitors all year round and the Visitor Centre portrays its turbulent past.

Winner of the country town prize in Beautiful Scotland in Bloom, Jedburgh offers an attractive setting to follow the town trail, take a riverside walk or browse amongst the shops in the colourful renovated buildings in the Market Place and Canongate. South of the town is the award winning Jedforest Deer and Farm Park. At nearby 16th century Ferniehirst Castle, the grounds and Kerr Information Centre are open to visitors on a limited basis. Near Ancrum to the north lies Monteviot House Gardens on the banks of the river and Harestanes Countryside Visitor Centre offering exhibitions and indoor or outdoor activities.

“Views of Jedburgh High street and the Abbey”

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Hadrians Wall and Hexham

Also in the region the massive man made feature that made it famous – Hadrian’s wall ! plus the old border town of Hexham the largest town in West Northumberland standing on the banks of the River Tyne. It is a very ancient ecclesiastical parish in its own right and there are many ancient spellings variations of the town’s name including Hutoldesham, Hestoldesham, Hextoldesham and Halgutstad. One interpretation is that the names refer to the tributaries to the Tyne which run through the town.

Here you can visit the Benedictine Abbey and church rebuilt in the 12th century. Close to Hexham is the world famous Hadrian’s Wall built in AD122 on the orders of the Roman Emperor Hadrian, and stretched from the East to West coasts of Britain, from Bowness on Solway in the West to Wallsend in the East. It is one of the most remarkable unique Roman monuments in the world.

Today, over 1800 years after its construction, Hadrian’s Wall still offers spectacular remains for examination. When building the Wall, the Romans made use of the rugged landscape of Northumberland for defensive purposes, and the fact that the countryside has changed little since those times helps to transport the visitor back to those far-off days.In its heyday, Hadrian’s Wall was garrisoned by thousands of troops, who watched over the northern horizon from turrets and milecastles placed at regular intervals along the Wall, and lived in a series of more substantial forts at strategic locations. Several of these forts are open to the visitor today, featuring substantial remains and museums and visitor centres of differing sizes and styles, giving an insight into the life lived by a soldier on Rome’s northern frontier. More information www.dgvisitor.co.uk/attractions.htm

Hexham and Hadrian’s Wall

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Sea View Cottage West Coast – Accommodation

Your Accommodation Local Activities Enquiries + Bookings Travel Directions Turnberry and Golf Fantastic Day Trips

A most welcoming hall receives you at ground level, leading to a drawing room with open fire, dining room with dining table that can seat 12 adults with wood burning stove. Along with the grand kitchen a drying room, utility room, W.C and games room with pool table. The bedrooms are all situated on the floors above with one bedroom with en-suite bathroom and five further bedrooms with two bathrooms. All the bedrooms have zip-and-link beds, making them either double or twin rooms. furniture, three super king size beds, an original roll top bath and stunning views across the Firth of Clyde.

The Ground floor – Entrance hall leading to the The large Sitting Room (approx 50 square metres) with 2 large sofas, 2 large chairs and Pouffe. Open fire place and high quality HIFI music system.

The dining room has a grand dining table seating up to 12 adults and wood burning stove. In this room there is also flat screen Sky HD television, DVD player & WI box, Very Large sofa and Pouffe, card / games table.

The well equipped kitchen with all Crockery, Cookware, Utensils, Glassware, there is a Dishwasher, Large Fridge Freezer, Gas Hob & Oven. There is also the boiler room, with drying area. Plus a utility room; W.C, with wash hand basin;

The games room has a pool table, 2 sitting chairs, TV / DVD / Free view with low ceiling, also badminton equipment, football, netball.

First floor – Stairs; Double / Twin room, with king size double zip-and-link bed; Double / Twin room, with super king size double zip-and-link bed, with flat screen TV; Double / Twin room, with super king size double zip-and-link bed, with en-suite bathroom (which can also be accessed via main corridor) with an old fashioned style Combi Bath / Shower, W.C and wash hand basin; Double / Twin room, with super king size double zip-and-link bed, with flat screen TV, with en-suite dressing area, with en-suite bathroom, with roll top bath, separate shower cabinet, W.C and wash hand basin; stairs.

Second Floor – Stairs; Double / Twin room, with super king size double zip-and-link bed, with flat screen TV; bathroom, with bath, w.c and wash hand basin; Double / Twin room, with super king size Beds

Total Bedrooms & Bathrooms, 1 double or twin bedroom/s with en-suite bathroom, 5 double or twin bedroom/s with shared bathroom.

A summary of features of this 5 star venue, BBQ, CD Player, WIFI, Central Heating, DVD Player, Dishwasher, Fridge Freezer, Gas Hob & Oven, Initial Supply of Logs, Internet Access, Microwave, Satellite TV in all rooms, Tumble Dryer, Washing Machine, Wine Cooler / Fridge, Wood Burning Stove, Open Fire, Wireless Broadband and Kennels available. Please note the games room has limited head room with pool table.

Features, Facilities & Services Linen, towels, electricity, heating and an initial supply of fuel for the open fire included within the rental.